Hidden Gems: Louisburg Square

It often escapes me that Boston encompasses more than just our strip of campus. But, whenever I seem to forget, I find myself in some unknown part of the city that makes me love it even more. This past week, I had to go on a Boston scavenger hunt with my organizational behavior team. We walked and walked until we got to the Public Garden. And then, turning left toward Beacon, we ended up at Beacon Hill.

While this is a well-reputed neighborhood in the city, it was my first time ever being in the area. Though some of you might have visited the cute boutiques and bistros of Beacon Hill before, very few of you have probably made it up the hill to Louisburg Square, the most expensive neighborhood in our local area and one of the most expensive in the country. When you overcome the intimidation of its perfection and climb the winding hill, you are presented with intersecting rows of flawless townhouses. This time of year, the snow atop the red brick makes a charming contrast.

With literally nobody in sight during the day, this neighborhood, which is named after the Battle of Louisburg, is the perfect place to escape from the city bustle. You get the calmness of a suburb and the charm of the Puritan-era, all in one little corner tucked away on Beacon Hill. When it starts to get warmer outside, you could make a day trip out of the neighborhood, which is filled with street-style boutiques. Walking up and down the hills will be a good work out, too.

There’s so much we tend to miss about Boston, even though we live so close to so many different locales in a city full of history. In Louisburg Square, the average price for a townhouse is over $6 million. It’s difficult to take the time to appreciate that monumental events in history happened in our vicinity. So, if you can battle the Boston chill, you should definitely take a stroll around Beacon Hill, walking toward the true gem that is Louisburg Square. It is an area with a lot of character and something that will surely give you perspective on our city and its rich history.

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