Category: Features

The Muse: Your guide to summer 2014

By Hannah Landers, Muse Editor
@hannland

Summer is almost here, time to relax with good music, movies, and food./ PHOTO VIA Flickr user Adam Baker

Summer is almost here, time to relax with good music, movies, and food./ PHOTO VIA Flickr user Adam Baker

Sweet summer is almost here, which means it’s almost time for The Muse to take a vacation. But before we grab our flip-flops and short-shorts, we have a few final suggestions to make this summer the most Muse-tastic ever. Below is a list of movies to see, albums to listen to, food to nom on and lifestyle events to check out during the long, hot days. Enjoy your summer, Musies! And don’t forget the sunscreen!

Movies

Book adaptation: “The Fault in Our Stars” (June 6) — Sure, “The Giver” promises performances from the likes of Meryl Streep, Jeff Bridges and, er, Taylor Swift. But “The Fault in Our Stars” has a beautifully tragic story and a fresh-faced cast. If the trailer alone doesn’t make you tear up, you are a monster.

Epic: “Godzilla” (May 16) — Walter White from “Breaking Bad” takes on one of film’s most infamous monsters. Need I say more?

Comedy: “22 Jump Street” (June 13) — If you liked Channing Tatum and Jonah Hill as undercover cops in high school, you’re going to love them as undercover cops in college. Ja feel?

Superhero: “Guardians of the Galaxy” (August 1) — With a team of characters that includes a genetically engineering raccoon marksman and a “tree-like humanoid,” “Guardians” promises to be “The Avengers’” weird younger brother. The diverse cast is another draw, especially with a newly buff and mostly shirtless Chris Pratt leading the pack (am I right, ladies?).

Once in a lifetime: Boyhood” (July 11) — Director Richard Linklater tells the story of a young boy growing into adulthood, but because he shot the film over a period of 12 years, the audience is actually watching young actor Ellar Coltrane age from 7 years old to 18 years old in a span of three hours.

Music

Rock ‘n’ roll royalty: Jack White’s “Lazaretto” (June 10) — Jack White’s last solo venture was filled with a lot of good ol’ blues-tinged rock ‘n’ roll. Here’s hoping that this album is more of the same.

Girl power: Lykke Li’s “I Never Learn” (May 6) — The ethereal Swedish songstress is back after three years, promising more subtle brilliance with her one-of-a-kind voice.

Indie comeback kid: Conor Oberst’s “Upside Down Mountain” (May 20) — Bright Eyes front-man Oberst usually injects a little more of his country-tinged Nebraska roots into his solo releases and vocal assists from folk duo First Aid Kit only sweetens the deal.

James Blake 2.0: Sam Smith’s “In the Lonely Hour” (June 17) — If you caught Smith’s performance on “Saturday Night Live” in March, you know the power of this Brit’s haunting and soulful melodies. At only 21 years old, Smith is slated for a meteoric rise.

Movie mix-tape: American Laundromat Records’ “I Saved Latin! A Tribute to Wes Anderson” (May 13) — This 23-track album features a diverse array of artists covering songs from Wes Anderson’s iconic films. Muted color schemes and Jason Schwartzman not included.

Food

Chocolate chip cookie milk shot: From the genius who brought you the “cronut,” the chocolate chip cookie milk shot is exactly what it sounds like: a chocolate chip cookie in the shape of a shot glass filled with milk. It’s a magical update on a childhood favorite.

Infused ice: Ice cubes no longer have to be the boring frozen treat of your summer. Restaurants are starting to see the potential of infusing them with herbs, fruit and other goodies in order to spice up cocktails and other drinks. Cheers!

A spot of tea: From tea leaves in entrees to tea-based cocktails, there’s plenty of ways to enjoy tea without having to sip a steaming hot cup in the middle of July.

Ice cream sandwich smorgasbord: After enduring years of the cupcake’s reign as most popular dessert, it looks as though we’ll all be screaming for ice cream sandwiches from roaming food trucks soon enough.

Adult popsicles: Booze-infused popsicles aren’t a relatively new idea, but the fun flavor possibilities and their simple prep make them a no-brainer for summer.

Lifestyle

Music festivals: For many, summer is equated with hanging outdoors and listening to their favorite bands. Muse did a blog post earlier in April with a list of the best music festivals across the country. All you have to do is pick one (or two … or five).

Get your drink on: You don’t have to be in traditional “wine country” to take a tour of a winery. Or, if beer is more your thing, check out a brewery. Sites such as Groupon offer great rates that include tours, food pairings and of course, tastings.

Stuff your face: Food festivals happen nearly everywhere, and they’re a great place to expand your palette and maybe even find your new favorite restaurant. Some of them are even tailored to a state’s signature dish, such as the Maine Lobster Festival.

Pay homage to your favorite author: Okay, this one is kind of a stretch, but if you happen to be in Florida this summer, why not remember a famous author who used to live there? Hemingway Days is a five-day festival in July that includes book signings, readings, a fishing tournament in honor of the author’s favorite sport and a look-alike contest (Google some pictures and thank me later).

Spotlight: NYC v. Boston

By Stacy Schoonover, Staff Writer
@stacyscootover

Obviously, Boston is better than New York City./ PHOTO VIA Flickr user Roberto Zingales

Boston: home of the Red Sox, the Bruins, and Boston University./ PHOTO VIA Flickr user Roberto Zingales

I spent this past weekend in New York, and while NYC is the “big apple” and the “largest city in the U.S.” I couldn’t help thinking how much I love Boston more. Don’t get me wrong, New York is amazing — but there is just something about Boston that makes it superior. Let me explain…

New York is amazing because:

1. 24-Hour Subway

This city never sleeps. While Boston just go the T to stay open until 3 a.m. on Friday and Saturdays, New York is transporting people on a Tuesday at 4 a.m., and it’s wonderful.

2. That being said, the city never sleeps

Boston’s bedtime is that of an old married couple having to wake up the next morning for a nine to five workday. New York has nightlife, bars, events and activities at all hours.

3. The streets are blocked, and they make sense

If someone told me I had to be at 42nd and 6th, I wouldn’t have to get out MapQuest, or take a cab just to avoid getting lost or being late. In Boston, the streets don’t make sense. Bottom Line.

4. Central Park is better than the Boston Common

Both are gorgeous… but Central Park has a zoo. A zoo, people! 1.317 square miles of adventures, playgrounds, animals, zoos, concerts, etc. is better than 50 acres of trees.

5. New York is the Cultural Capital of the World

Home to the United Nations and a hub of international affairs, New York is more cultural in food, fashion and other cultural markets. Boston is more centered on remembering the past with its strong historical background.

Boston is way better than New York because:

New York City has a lot to offer, but can it stand up to Boston?/ PHOTO VIA Flickr user Chris Isherwood

New York City has a lot to offer, but can it stand up to Boston?/ PHOTO VIA Flickr user Chris Isherwood

1. New York is too crowded

The traffic of the Boston Marathon is the traffic on a normal day on 42nd street in New York. Boston is more livable, and while Boston is still touristy, it doesn’t stand out as much as the most populated city in the U.S.

2. We have the North End

Enough said.

3. Boston smells better

There isn’t as much pollution, and that is a beautiful thing.

4. Sports

Yes New York has won 47 professional championships, but it’s the largest city in the U.S. Boston is the 21st largest city in the U.S., and has won 34 professional championships. Go Sox. Go Bruins. We win.

5. Boston is the hub of history

Home of the Boston Massacre, Boston Tea Party and many other significant moments of the American Revolution, there’s so many historical sights to see. We also have the first public school in the U.S., the first subway system and the Boston Common is the oldest city park in the U.S.

And most importantly, Boston is home to BU, the best school ever! So, we win.

Science Tuesday: The science of sleep

By Sanah Faroke, Staff Writer
@sanahfaroke

If only we could learn in our sleep.../  PHOTO VIA Flickr user Mrehan

If only we could learn in our sleep…/ PHOTO VIA Flickr user Mrehan

Behold! We have entered the ‘week of death,’ i.e. the week before finals week. We’ve entered the dome of late night strategy sessions, unhealthy food choices, and nocturnal raccoon eyes covered over with concealer. Wait, is that just me?

Well, Katniss and I might be BFFs because I feel like I’ve been chosen to participate in the ‘Hunger Games.’ It’s a battle to the death, but really, we’re all just creating this battle with our internal biological clock.

I’ve always been a night owl. I think better and produce higher-quality work at night. However, I’m a miserable troll in the morning when I have to wake up at 8 a.m. for class. I’m such a rebel, defying this clock, but by disrupting these neurons that tell me what to do and when to do it, it puts everything else out of wack.

The neurons in the brain are no bigger than the size of a mustard seed, according to The Atlantic. The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) tells me when I should have breakfast or go to sleep, as well as determining functions like social and sexual behaviors. It’s what makes me a night owl and what makes normal people, well, normal.

According to Seth Blackshaw, an associate professor of neuroscience at John Hopkins University, these characteristics can be genetic, and in a sense, predetermined. In a new study conducted by Blackshaw, SCN deteriorates as you age.

When I was a kid, I hated naps. I’d tell my mom that “day is for play and night is for sleep.” Clearly as a college student, that has changed drastically, but one thing is the same: I fight sleep. Back then, I wouldn’t take naps, and now, I drink coffee instead of giving in. Nevertheless, according to Blackshaw, being awake when our body is obviously tired is bad for you.

For those who pull all-nighters — you deserve a medal. I don’t know how you guys do it, but you do. You better save that medal though because some studies show that you have a higher chance of getting cancer or having a heart attack. So is the medal and a crappy paper worth your health? Probably not, but you’re setting yourself up for it if you stray from the SCN master clock.

In Blackshaw’s study, researchers removed a key gene in mice that helps the SCN communicate with other cells, because SCN communicates with cells in the entire body. He found that instead of the mice operating as if their Monday was a normal 24-hour schedule, they worked as if they have two or three body clocks controlling them at the same time (which kind of feels like my average Monday anyway).

Blackshaw concluded that the clock was still running, but it wasn’t synchronized. It’s why some people are like the living dead during the day, but at night are little miss peppy. I actually live in constant pep, but that’s just because I drink too much coffee, not because I sleep enough. I should probably attempt to do better. I’ll pencil it in … after graduation.

In Biz: A semester in review

By Emily Overholt, Staff Writer
@EmilyOverholt

Exploring the merits of sleeping in v. actually going to class./ PHOTO via Emily Overholt

Exploring the merits of sleeping in v. actually going to class./ PHOTO via Emily Overholt

So here we are folks. One full semester of InBiz back in action. Are you proud? I’m proud. I thought for my final blog I’d take a stroll down memory lane with you through my weird business-like rants.

1. I talked about skipping class and what it costs you for tuition. This blog was 100 percent per my father’s request and definitely a criticism of my own habits. Although I am proud to say I have attended 99 percent of my classes this semester, a new all time high. Sure it took me almost all of college to get here, but it’s the thought that counts.

Why this post worked: I had to do math. It was relevant. I had to learn how to blog.
Why this post didn’t work: I had to do math. Ouch.

2. My first adventure into the listicle was inspired by trying to buy lottery tickets with convenience points. I learned that I have slightly more respect for Buzzfeed because being witty is hard. I also learned that Tumblrs that make gifs often have names we can’t publish. Way to go Tumbr.

Why this post worked: Listicles! Gifs! The constant lament that I can’t buy beer at the BU Pub with monopoly money!
Why it didn’t work: I’m not actually that funny. Sorry guys.

A "Game of Thrones" GIF for the listicle because, well, "Game of Thrones"./ GIF VIA reactiongifs.com

A “Game of Thrones” GIF for the listicle on finding a subletter because, well, “Game of Thrones”./ GIF VIA reactiongifs.com

3. In March I decided to complain about Slate complaining. I know, super meta. Sure, I may have thought of this blog by idly scrolling through Twitter and picking the first thing I could have an opinion on, but that doesn’t mean my strong feelings about Slate are any less real. Seriously, ask me about Slate some time. I have a lot of feelings.

Why it worked: I was forced to analyze other people’s convictions as well as look at how marketing works. In a lot of ways I had to think the most for this blog. Maybe Slate did win in the end.
Why it didn’t: Unless other people also noticed that Slate wouldn’t stop beating a dead horse, I probably was typing into the abyss.

4. And finally, my penultimate log was about Game of Thrones and finding subletters.

Why it worked: Game of Thrones
Why it didn’t: No one contacted me to sublet me apartment…

Thanks for InBizing with me!

Spotlight: The return of Edgar Allen Poe

By Stacy Schoonover, Staff Writer
@stacyscootover

The FreeP's take on Poe./ PHOTO BY Maya Devereaux

The FreeP’s take on Poe./ PHOTO BY Maya Devereaux

The goal to bring Edgar Allen Poe back to Boston has finally been reached! The Edgar Allan Poe Foundation of Boston has been raising funds to install Stefanie Rocknak’s Poe Returning to Boston statue, and they finally reached their goal last month.

Rocknak’s statue, chosen from 265 different proposals, shows Poe walking and holding a briefcase with a raven by his side. It’s currently being constructed at New England Sculpture Services in Chelsea, Mass.

Poe, famous for his dark and captivating tales such as “The Raven” and “The Fall of the House of Usher,” was born in Boston in 1809, which the foundation wanted to honor and recognize. Other states show memorials and museums of Poe and his accomplishments, but until now Poe has been kept quiet in the Boston community.

The statue will be installed in Poe Square, located at the intersection of Boylston Street and Charles Street South. Former Mayor Thomas M. Menino dedicated the square, near Poe’s former residence, in 2009, shortly after the Poe Foundation formed.

Thanks to a year of fundraising and a $10,000 grant from the Lynch Foundation, the funding goal of $225,000 has been reached. This money was needed to fund the fabrication, transportation and installation of the statue. It will even cover the maintenance of the statue after installation.

The statue will be revealed at 2 p.m. on Sunday October 5, 2014, just a few days before the 165th anniversary of Poe’s death.

However, here at the FreeP, we were thinking of our own way to honor Poe before October. We thought of locking someone behind one of the walls of the FreeP, putting a beating heart under one of the desks in the office or even keeping a pet raven. But we settled on making a statue of our own. Enjoy.

Science Tuesday: Pulling all-nighters doesn’t help you cram

By Sanah Faroke, Staff Writer
@sanahfaroke

When I took my core classes at the beginning of my college career, I pulled all nighters studying for my exams for days at a time. I made immense study guides, until my TA told me that my 32-page guide was equivalent to a grad student’s. My memorization isn’t the best (remember my issue with the Memory Game?) and I didn’t do too hot on my exams.

Turns out, according to a series of recent studies, like one presented at the Cognitive Neuroscience Society earlier this week, lack of sleep is detrimental to remembering things like test answers and where you put your keys.

Sleep, according to the study, not only helps us remember what we did in the past, but also reminds us of what we want to do in the future. Susanne Diekelmann of the University of Tübingen and her colleagues found that there are two ways to remember our intentions. One can be if we internally recite what we want to do, like repeating that “Parenthood” is airing tonight and you need to watch it, or you can store your intentions in the memory network. If it’s stored well enough, then you won’t have to internally remind yourself that your show is coming on later that day.

Diekelmann and her researchers made these discoveries through word pairing: half of the participants were told that they’d have to remember material later and then were either instructed to sleep for two full nights or were kept awake one night and were allowed to sleep the second night. Diekelmann found that the subjects who slept both nights performed better on the test.

I’ve always claimed to be a night owl, because it’s true — I work better at night. But it’s also true that when I don’t get enough rest, I bomb my exams. No amount of coffee could help me there (and trust, me, I’ve tried). So take a break, study with enough time, and make sure you get a good night’s rest. You’re going to need it!

The Muse: The Pizza Underground takes cover bands to a whole new level

By Hannah Landers, Staff Writer
@hannland

Macaulay Culkin's band "The Pizza Underground" is sure to leave you hungry for more./ PHOTO VIA Flickr user Samat Jain

Macaulay Culkin’s band Pizza Underground is sure to leave you hungry for more./ PHOTO VIA Flickr user Samat Jain

A famous actor or actress who also performs in a band is hardly a rarity these days. When he’s not saving women from being hit by cars or handing out free boxes of Girl Scout cookies, Ryan Gosling performs in his ghost-centric band, Dead Man’s Bones. And silky-haired Oscar winner Jared Leto actually spends more time fronting his band, 30 Seconds to Mars, than he does acting.

But the most outrageous of these celebrity band incarnations is no doubt Macaulay Culkin’s The Pizza Underground, which takes Velvet Underground songs and makes them all about — you guessed it — pizza. So instead of “I’m Waiting for the Man” and “Femme Fatale,” The Pizza Underground serves up “I’m Waiting for Delivery Man” and “Pizza Gal.” The band also features an unusual set of instruments, like glockenspiel, kazoo and, appropriately, the pizza box (although how one goes about playing a pizza box is beyond me). All this talk about pizza cover bands has got us over at the Muse hungry for more food-themed cover bands, so here’s a list that we hope some brave (or perhaps just out-of-work) celebrity will one day form.

The Meatles — These guys would only perform in special shows at butcher shops wearing bloodstained aprons. Just don’t bring your vegetarian friends to a show. Hits might include “Strawberry Veal Forever” and “Sa-La-Mi, Bo-Log-Na.”

The Black Peas — Not to be mistaken for The Black EYED Peas, the Black Peas would be a veggie-themed rock ‘n’ roll cover band for those too faint-of-heart for the Meatles. Hits might include “Chard Row” and “Lonely Bok Choy.”

Bon-Bon Iver — You’ll be begging for seconds after hearing the sugary sweet crooning of this bearded dessert-loving songbird. Albums could be baked into cookies and then sold to sweet-toothed fans. Hits might include “Not So Skinny Love” and “Halloween (Candy).”

The Peach Boys — The ultimate feel-good band of the summer would only be improved with a fruity touch! Each band member could wear those tall hats with all the fruit stacked on top. Hits might include “Wild Honeydew” and “Banana Ann.”

Dungeness Crab for Cutie — This band would only play on ships, wearing traditional sailor garb. They would be a huge hit on cruises. Hits might include “Eel Follow You – Watch Out, A Shark!” and “Shoal Meets Cod-y.”

The Rolling Scones — This one would probably work best with British band members. They know their teatime, after all. Hits might include “You Butter Move On” and “Paint It Red (With Strawberry Jam, Please).

Science Tuesday: Employers rank personality over technical skills

By Sanah Faroke, Staff Writer
@sanahfaroke

The first job I applied to was for a temp position at a Barnes and Noble bookstore in my hometown. I was terrified about the interview process and I tend to scare myself by doubting my qualifications, but once I got in there, I was hired on the spot.  I figured that as long as I didn’t have a criminal record or a really heavy accent, I’d be golden.

The thing is, I didn’t have any real experience in the bookselling industry, and even then, I beamed with excitement about being around books (and possibly finding ones I wanted to buy) and I’m all about working hard, which the manager liked.

According to a recent study from CareerBuilder, employers aren’t just looking for candidates that have the desired skills, but also the personality. They don’t go hand in hand, but they’re measured in importance equally, which is good news for people like me. Having a pleasant personality in a job interview isn’t a new thing, but according to the study, having good humor, good fashion sense or pop culture knowledge can play a part in getting hired. Finally, all that useless pop culture trivia will pay off.

The study, conducted online by Harris Interactive, questioned 2,076 managers and human resource professionals nationwide about qualities they looked for in candidates and what they kept tabs on while the employee was working between May 14 and June 5, 2013.

The top personality traits managers looked for in new employees were:

1. Hard workers
2. Dependable
3. Positive
4. Self-motivated
5. Team-oriented
6. Organized
7. Good under pressure
8. Effective communicators
9. Flexible
10. Confident (ehem, not cocky)

One day, the manager who hired me asked if I’d been manning the phones all day, and I had been. He then told me that a customer called him and told him that he should permanently hire the girl answering the phones and so, I was no longer a temp (and no longer a cashier).

Although I technically didn’t perform well under all tasks, I persevered, worked hard and was always cheerful and motivated.

So although knowing how to code or film with a JVC camera or cook with a skillet are things you may need to know for your industry, remember that hard skills aren’t the only qualities employees look at. And heads up, they’ll also stalk you on social media, so you better fix that up too.

Good luck to all you seniors venturing out into the real world soon. Take note from “Morning Glory”: Becky may be embarrassingly enthusiastic, but the point is, she got the job!

In Biz: Professor Boches on digital brands

By Madeline McGill, Staff Writer
@mcgilligansisle

There are few college students who are not familiar with at least one well-known digital brand. Staples such as Facebook, Twitter and Tumblr  have blended seamlessly into our lives, dominating our day-to-day rituals. Casual actions like waking up and checking Facebook or browsing through BuzzFeed during a study break  demonstrate the significant influence that digital brands hold.

Edward Boches, an advertising professor at Boston University’s College of Communication, says that digital brands are significant in that they often serve a certain utility, which is changing the landscape of how the idea of a brand is defined.

“By definition a digital brand isn’t something that you buy and wear, it isn’t something that you buy and eat, it isn’t something that you buy and drive, it’s something that you use on a day in day out basis,” said Boches. “So it has to add enough value to your life that it’s something you want to use.”

When one stops to think about how a digital brand such as Facebook became such an integral part of our social interactivity, the story becomes less clear. Yes, many digital brands arose to meet the growing market need for social media services. But how did the ideas behind Snapchat and Instagram turn into multi-million and billion dollar industries?

Boches said he believes that there are certain factors  that contribute to the success of a digital brand. One of these, he stated, is an available user base.

“If you look at the value of any digital brand, whether it’s Instagram, Snapchat, Facebook, Twitter, a blog like the Bleacher Report, it’s pretty much based on how many eyeballs it has,” said Boches. “

What use would Instagram be if no one had instant access to a camera at all times of the day? Part of the company’s success is that it was able to take advantage of the utility of the modern camera phone while creating a digital platform that appealed to a wide audience.

Appealing to a wide audience, according to Boches, can also be achieved by a frictionless user experience.

“Because you think about anything that you use in that space, and if it works really easily, really seamlessly, really simply, really institutive, and has very low friction to it, then you will tend to use it more,” said Boches. “So think about how fast Instagram took off. You didn’t need to figure it out or think about it.”

However, any avid Instagram user can tell you that it is not all about the individual user experience. There is a great need for users to share their experiences with their network, and Instagram provides a digital space where that need can be met.

“So why did Instagram take off so quickly? Because all of a sudden everybody in the world is walking around with a camera in their pocket that can capture images and what are you going to do with those images?” said Boches. “You’re going to want to share them and look and other people’s pictures, and so it could only have existed when all of a sudden the camera in your pocket was a universal thing. Which by the way was also connected to the web, which was connected to your social profile, which was connected to everything else.”

Digital brands that effectively tap into an active user base will experience astounding results. Since its  launch, Instagram boasts more than 200 million monthly users, 70% of whom log in at least once a day.

Recognizing the success effectively cultivating and mobilizing a user base may yield, there are individuals who use the process of digital branding, through digital brands such as Facebook and Twitter, to promote themselves or an idea that they want to share.

Many college students are familiar with the Twitter user @BostonTweet, who created a Twitter account in 2008 to promote  local business activity during the economic downturn. Boasting 112 thousand followers as of April 13, account creator Tom O’Keefe has successfully marketed himself as a personal brand to the Boston area.

According to Boches, this is just one example of how any individual can market themselves via emerging forms of digital media.

“You could be a brand,” said Boches. “If you’re a reporter, and you have a column, and you have a Twitter account, and then you also have a blog, and you also have a Instagram, and you share all of your content and you build a community of followers, and they pay attention to you and seek out and subscribe to your content, then you are a small brand.”

It may not fit the traditional definition of a brand, but it is all part of an evolving transition that is changing the way that the public regards the traditional definition of a brand.

According to Boches, anyone who is resourceful, determined and prolific could accomplish what @BostonTweet has done with the digital resources at their disposal.

“When I was your age, you needed five million dollars to do anything,” said Boches. “Now there’s a multi-billion dollar infrastructure courtesy of Facebook, Google, Twitter, the web, YouTube, et cetera… I think what it means is that anybody with the wherewithal, with the creativity, with an idea, with content, et cetera, can do something.”

Boches added that though actual content creators comprise a smaller proportion of social media platforms than content distributors, generational changes have encouraged the increase in the percentage of content creators.

“There’s an argument that goes like this: of all the people on all the platforms, whatever they are, Pinterest, Twitter, WordPress, across all those platforms probably only 10 or 15 percent of the people who use them are actually creating content and calling attention to themselves. 30 or 40 percent of people are maybe distributing and sharing it, and passing it around or commenting it or interacting with it. The rest are just reading it, as consumers,” said Boches. “But, if you look at those numbers, that 15 percent of content creators used to be 5, then it was 10, now it’s at 15 and I think as your generation and subsequent generations have something to say, you’re growing up with the idea that ‘Well, we own the media. The media belongs to us.’”

With the ingrained idea that people have the power to manipulate the media, what are the future implications of digital brands and the process of digital branding? With more resources available, it is expected that the number of personal and digital brands will arise via the use of social media platforms.

“I do think that it’s not that we’re going to see less of it,” said Boches. “It might be harder to stand out, and harder to get real notoriety, and you might have to be more inventive and more creative and better at it.”

The Muse: music festivals happening this summer

By Olivia Shur and Hannah Landers, Staff Writers
@livsure @hannland

Electric Daisy Carnival Weekend./ PHOTO VIA Flickr user Tony Nungaray

Which music festival will you choose?/ PHOTO VIA Flickr user Tony Nungaray

Summertime means warm weather, no classes and — most importantly — the best music festivals of the year. Here’s a list of just a few of them, including where, when and, of course, who is going to be there. No matter what genre of music you like to jam to this summer, Muse has you covered.

BOSTON CALLING

When: May 23-25
Where: Boston
Lineup highlights: Jack Johnson, Death Cab for Cutie, Modest Mouse, The Decemberists, Bastille, The Neighbourhood
Why you should go: Why venture far when there’s a great music festival right in Boston University’s own backyard? Boston Calling also offers the chance for concertgoers to get their fix twice a year — once in May and once in September. So if you’re leaving Boston for the summer, look out for that September lineup come move-in weekend.

SASQUATCH

When: May 23-25
Where: George, Wash.
Lineup highlights: Outkast, The National, Queens of the Stone Age, HAIM, M.I.A., Kid Cudi
Why you should go: Although Sasquatch! usually sticks to indie bands and singer-songwriters, it still has a rather varied lineup. It also boasts a pretty great view: The Gorge Amphitheater, carved right into the cliffs above the Columbia River Gorge, was voted “Top Amphitheater” in the 2013 Billboard Touring Awards.

ELECTRIC DAISY CARNIVAL

When: May 24-25 (New York City), June 20-22 (Las Vegas)
Where: New York City and Las Vegas
Lineup highlights: Tiësto, Bassnectar and Afrojack are included in New York; the Las Vegas lineup has yet to be announced
Why you should go: For the electronic music fan, this one’s a no brainer: EDC Las Vegas is the biggest electronic music festival in the world. Last year’s festival certainly seemed to promise more good things to come too, and year’s EDC in Las Vegas has sold out before even releasing a lineup.

FIREFLY

When: June 19-22
Where: Dover, Del.
Lineup highlights: Outkast (again), Foo Fighters, Imagine Dragons, The Lumineers, Arctic Monkeys, Weezer
Why you should go: One of the smallest states is packing some major festival game. Firefly is a relative newcomer to the world of music fests, but has gotten everything right so far with its killer lineups and pleasant, woodland setting.

SUMMERFEST

When: June 25-29, July 1-6
Where: Milwaukee
Lineup highlights: Neon Trees, B.o.B., A Great Big World and Pentatonix are all performing on the general admission stages; Bruno Mars and Lady Gaga are among those performing in the Marcus Amphitheater
Why you should go: Though those from the coasts may never have heard of Summerfest, it holds the title for world’s largest music festival. Last year, attendees could buy a pass for all 11 days of the festival for just $60. The pass offered admission to any concert on any day, excluding the performers in the headliner arena, the Marcus Amphitheater.

LOLLAPALOOZA

When: Aug. 1-3
Where: Chicago
Lineup highlights: Eminem, Lorde, Foster the People, The Kooks, Chvrches, Jacob Plant
Why you should go: Lollapalooza is one of the biggest music festivals in the country — and notorious for selling out before half of concertgoers even get a chance to look at the lineup. With those kinds of stats, they must be doing something right.

BONNAROO

When: June 12-15
Where: Manchester, Tenn.
Lineup highlights: Kanye West, The Avett Brothers, Jack White, Vampire Weekend, Elton John, Neutral Milk Hotel, Lionel Richie
Why you should go: Bonnaroo is the holy pinnacle that all music festivals strive toward. An extravaganza that can attract indie royalty like Vampire Weekend, hip-hop messiahs like Kanye West and kings of music in general like Elton John really needs no further explanation.

WARPED TOUR

When: June 14 to Aug. 3
Where: Various cities throughout the U.S.
Lineup highlights: Less Than Jake, K.Flay, Bayside, Yellowcard, Anberlin, The Devil Wears Prada (lineup varies from city to city)
Why you should go: This year let the festival come to you! Warped may have strayed from its punky roots in recent years, but a diversified lineup has only made it stronger as it approaches its 20th birthday.