Tagged: hip-hop

The Beauty of Dance: evolution of dance parodies

By Shivani Patel, Staff Writer
@shizupates

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you have surely heard of the YouTube video “Evolution of Dance” by Judson Laipply. With over 250 million views, it has become one of the most popular videos on YouTube.

In it, Laipply imitates dance styles from the 50s all the way to the end of the 90s. Some of the hits he dances to include “Thriller,” “Walk Like An Egyptian,” “Macarena” and, of course, “Bye Bye Bye.” After the success of his video, Laipply created Evolution of Dance 2 and is currently working on Evolution of Dance 3, which is sure to include more modern tunes.

But of course, what’s a YouTube video without its parodies?

Jimmy Fallon, Tonight Show host and king of parodies, created a few parodies based on this insanely popular dance video.

His first parody of the video, “Evolution of Hip-Hop Dancing,” was a tribute to the most popular hip-hop dance moves over the decades. So of course he danced on stage with Will Smith.

While this version was popular, Fallon released another parody of “Evolution of Dance” that became even more popular – “Evolution of Mom Dancing” starring himself and Michelle Obama. The video is incredibly entertaining and accurate at the same time. The thought behind the video was to encourage both parents and children to get up and stay active as part of the First Lady’s campaign, “Let’s Move!

The duo started off with the “Go Shopping, Get Groceries” and “Raise the Roof.” My personal favorite is “Where’s Your Father (Get Him Back Here!)” If there’s one thing this video shows, it’s that Michelle Obama can dance.

Check out the video below:

The Beauty of Dance: Indian Fusion at BU

By Shivani Patel, Staff Writer
@shizupates

The BU Jalwa team/ PHOTO VIA David Uzvalok

The BU Jalwa team/ PHOTO VIA David Uzvalok

I clearly remember researching colleges during the summer before senior year, trying to decide what qualities of a college were really important to me. Sure, academics were the forerunner, but my teachers kept emphasizing the importance of a well-rounded college career.

They stressed that the college I would end up going to had to be the right “fit” for me. That idea really resonated with me, and I began to research colleges for other qualities rather than solely academics, which my parents supported.

With almost eight years of dancing under my belt, I knew I couldn’t let it go so easily. So, when it came down to my decisions, it was basically Boston University vs. Emerson College (I’m sure you can figure out which one I chose).

Upon deciding on BU, I did a bunch of research, and yes, that included dance teams. Despite how embarrassing it is, the fact of the matter is that I knew I wanted to be on Boston University’s Jalwa team when I got here. After being part of an all girls group for so many years, I wanted a change without straying too far from my favorite dance styles.

Not long after starting the Fall semester I became a member of BU Jalwa. We practice from 8:45-11 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays and 2:45-4:00 on Sundays. To give you a small idea of how intense this dance group is, being late results in a fee depending on the amount of minutes you were late. Let’s just say that you will rarely find me being late to practice. Oh, that broke college student life…

We begin each practice with stretches. After that, we usually focus on practicing one type of number of dance styles. Among these styles are bhangra (traditional dance from Punjab, India), hip-hop, contemporary and Bollywood (a fusion many different dance styles, but primarily from classical and modern Indian dances), not unlike this video.  Occasionally we dedicate to a practice to stunts, which, believe me, is as scary as it sounds.

This may not sound that bad, but enter competition season and everything changes.

All of a sudden, practices are ramped up to most (if not all) days of the week. The stress of learning different choreography, formations, and using costumes begins to pile on. During this period, the guys and girls on this team basically become like family – people I’m forced to like.

I’m only kidding, promise!

Seriously though, it takes a lot of dedication and effort from everyone, especially from our board, the individuals responsible for organizing our entire team.

But all this for an eight minute routine? You may wonder why. College of Arts and Sciences sophomore Rohan Rastogi has one answer:

“Competition season is grueling in terms of physical and mental stress, but it’s by far the most rewarding experience. There’s no feeling comparable to performing in front of a huge crowd and seeing an entire year’s worth of hard work pay off in a span of just eight minutes.”

Speaking of competition season, we are currently preparing for South Asian Showdown, a competition for Bollywood and Fusion dance teams. It will be held at John Hancock Hall right here in Boston on Saturday, February 8th starting at 6 p.m.

If you’d like to see all our hardwork finally being put onto stage, buy a ticket and come out and support BU Jalwa in our hometown!

Here’s a video of BU Jalwa performing in a dance competition a few years ago:

Hip Hop at Harvard

For Nas, the search starts at Harvard University./PHOTO VIA Flickr user Jonene Taddei Photography

Hip hop at Harvard? I’m sure you never expected to hear those two words in the same sentence.

Rap icon, Nas, ventured to Harvard University last week to introduce the Nasir Jones Hip Hop Fellowship, a scholarship awarded to two scholars dedicated to inciting change through hip hop music.

The fellowship is designed to help visiting scholars partake in hip-hop related research at the Cambridge institution. The scholarship is the result of a substantial endowment from an anonymous donor who wanted Nas to be the poster child of the unique program.

The donor got his wish when the Queens native agreed to lend his name to the fellowship following an email request from Harvard professor, Henry Louis Gates (the current host of PBS’ The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross).

During the introduction ceremony, Nas said, “Hip-hop is important like computer science. The world is changing. If you want to understand the youth, listen to the music. This is what’s happening right underneath your nose.”

I totally agree. If you want to understand why the current generation of young adults and adolescents act the way they do, check out the music they listen to. It’s not the main reason, but it’s a good indicator. Nas’s involvement with this program showcases his support of music as a cause rather than pure entertainment.

It may be ironic that the 18-time Grammy nominee is the face of an Ivy League scholarship despite never obtaining a high school diploma but Nas’s successful rap career epitomizes the belief that music is more than just lyrics and tempo.

Nas claimed that he was drawn to hip-hop because it is an education in it itself, aiming to address different problems. Despite being a middle school dropout, Nas used hip-hop to abandon his past mistakes and channel his struggles into songs that uplifted others.

Throughout his career Nas appealed to millions of people with message-filled songs like “The World is Yours” and “I Can.” Now he wants to open the door for others to do the same. Who would have thought he’d start the search at Harvard?

MUSE: Battle Royale: Who Runs Hip Hop in the 2010s?

By Brandon Kesselly, Staff Writer

Over the last few decades, the genre of hip hop has slowly been evolving. With each year, each new artist that has risen to ‘mainstream’ status has brought something new to the table (for better or for worse). Certain artists constantly push the boundaries either lyrically, sonically or both. Others tend to fly under the radar with a few notable songs. Sometimes, the producer has even outshined the artist, but one thing has remained clear: the genre has been progressing every year.

During the ‘90s, which has been dubbed the “Golden Age of Hip Hop,” the rise of popular rappers such as the Notorious B.I.G (Biggie), Tupac Shakur (2Pac), Nas or Jay-Z showcased the different directions in which the genre could progress. After the deaths of B.I.G. and Shakur, who were already locked in a deadly feud, Jay and Nas had their own feud.

Biggie and 2Pac are the most controversial artists of the era and the genre – with Biggie perfecting Big Daddy Kane’s braggadocio rap style and 2Pac adapting Slick Rick’s storytelling to fit his own tales. Jay succeeded Biggie as the big bragger, and Nas succeeded 2Pac as the dark storyteller and preacher as the 90s became the new millennium, what I like to call the New Age of Hip Hop.

New Age hip hop artists that became crucial movers and shakers were Eminem, Lil Wayne, 50 Cent and Kanye West. Eminem – who sold more albums than anyone else in this era – was the former protege of NWA rapper/producer Dr. Dre. Wayne was the adopted son and rising young rapper of Birdman; 50 was discovered by Eminem and became a hitmaker; and Kanye was the underdog producer-turned-rapper with an attitude that wanted to outshine his mentor, Jay-Z.

As the years went on, these names constantly popped up all over the genre as the biggest names in “the game” (despite OutKast and Lauryn Hill snagging DIAMOND albums). But eventually Eminem took a break and 50 lost his album duel to Kanye West as both released their 3rd studio albums on the same day. In the meantime, Wayne had released a stellar series of albums and mixtapes that had him claiming to be the “best rapper alive.” By 2010, Kanye and Lil Wayne were arguably the biggest names in hip hop during the 2000s.

2011 proved to be a good year as well for both of these titans as Kanye collaborated with Jay-Z for Watch the Throne and Lil Wayne released the best-selling hip hop album of the year with Tha Carter IV (which went double platinum). Both had also put together strong labels in West’s G.O.O.D. Music and Wayne’s Young Money Entertainment – a move that rising titan Rick Ross soon mirrored in his Maybach Music Group.

But with the rise of these new labels and their respective talents, I ask one question: who’s next? Who will be the big hip hop star of this decade?

Some names have already been thrown onto the table, names such as Drake, Nicki Minaj, J. Cole, Big Sean, Kendrick Lamar, Meek Mill, A$AP Rocky, the list goes on. What I am asking is that in another 10, 20 or 30 years, who will be controlling the genre?

As of August 2013, only three hip hop artists that debuted in the current decade have gone platinum: Drake, Nicki Minaj and Kendrick Lamar. Drake has two platinum albums. Nicki has two platinum albums. Kendrick has one. These three are the current stars of the genre. Who will join them? Who will end at the top?

Great hip-hop solo debuts

By Brandon Kesselly, Staff Writer
@BCKesso

In honor of the recent solo debuts of 2 Chainz, Kendrick Lamar and Meek Mill, as well as the coming debut of A$AP Rocky (2012’s four hip-hop heavy hitters), I wanted to list some of my favorite solo debut LPs of the genre:

Illmatic – Nas (February 1994): While it is not a very well-known fact, Nas actually debuted before Biggie. Nas’ debut—at the age of 20 – laid the groundwork for his later hit albums and his future beef with both Biggie and Jay-Z. The most notable feature of this album was that it lacked star guest features, focusing the attention on Nas from beginning to end.

Ready to Die – Notorious B.I.G. (September 1994): Biggie hit hard with this album, and—combined with his sophomore double-disc Life After Death—solidified himself as the most popular rapper of hip-hop’s “golden age” The storytelling and lyrical complexity on this album still make me shiver when I listen. “Juicy” and “Big Poppa” became major hits.

Reasonable Doubt – Jay Z (June 1996): The first of many great debuts for Jigga, this album has one of the rare moments where Jay Z and his friend, Biggie, traded verses in real life as opposed to recycled recordings (“Brooklyn’s Finest”). “Dead Presidents II” was also famous for sparking the beef between Jay and Nas.

Get Rich or Die Tryin’ – 50 Cent (February 2003) – 50 Cent made his major label debut with this 2003 classic, featuring hit songs such as “In Da Club,” “21 Questions” and “P.I.M.P.” The album went on to go eight times platinum as of 2011.

The College Dropout – Kanye West (February 2004): Kanye West is a name as synonymous with hip-hop production as Jimmy Hendrix is synonymous to epic guitar playing. When the “Izzo” producer finally began to put out his own songs, his own rap legend soon began, combined with further production work on songs for Jay-Z, Ludacris, Twista, Alicia Keys and more. Dropout gave the genre classic songs like “All Falls Down,” “Jesus Walks” and “Through The Wire.”

The Documentary – The Game (January 2005): 50 Cent’s (former) lieutenant, The Game, had a strong debut with The Documentary. A mixture of gritty gangsta rap and heavy-hitting party songs, the West Coast native was helped by his energetic delivery and production work from 50, Kanye West, Timbaland and Dr. Dre. His tracks “How We Do” “Dreams” and “Hate It or Love It” became instant classics.

Lupe Fiasco’s Food & Liquor - Lupe Fiasco (September 2006): Lupe Fiasco—a Chicago native—found an interesting niche in hip-hop, choosing to combine spoken word, nerdcore and skateboarding influences with the dark tales of the streets of his hometown. However, he balanced the tale of a slowly corrupted youth with fun stories and some of the most clever imagery and wordplay in the genre. “Kick, Push” and “Daydreamin’” became classics while songs like the Howard Zinn–inspired “American Terrorist” show Fiasco’s knack for historically driven raps.