Tagged: jobs

Getting a Job Post-grad is Easier Said Than Done

By Katrina Uy, Staff Writer
@katreenz

Many recent college grads are avoiding complete unemployment by taking on internships./ PHOTO VIA Flickr user James Lee

Many recent college grads are avoiding complete unemployment by taking on internships./ PHOTO VIA Flickr user James Lee

Spring semester is going by in the blink of an eye (how are we halfway through February already?) and BU is racking up the events for senior semester, like a trip to Foxwoods Resort Casino this past weekend, and an upcoming on-campus Matt and Kim concert, as well as parties counting down to graduation.

It’s all fun and games until someone asks the dreaded question feared most by seniors: “So, do you have any plans for after graduation?”

This week The New York Times tackled the issue of how, in a suffering economy where jobs are few and far between, many recent college graduates are feeling trapped in an endless cycle of internships that neither pay nor lead to permanent jobs.

For college students, landing an internship is a great way to boost your resume and learn valuable skills outside of the classroom. But many graduates, especially those aspiring to break into the fashion, film, or magazine industries, are finding themselves at a point where it is becoming increasingly difficult to break free from the cycle of unpaid work.

According to The Times article, post-graduate internship opportunities are far more abundant than job openings these days, making them easy bait for those fresh out of college. But some question whether it’s worth taking the time to work as interns, thereby delaying real employment, and if there’s even a light at the end of the tunnel.

The overall job economy is a major part of the reasons why most companies cannot afford to hire their interns. The overall unemployment rate was 7.4% in 2013, according to the Bureau of Labor statistics, though it has decreased to 6.6% as of Jan. 2014.

And of course, the unemployment rates vary depending on what your major is. Those studying in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) are probably better off than those studying liberal arts. A 2013 study conducted by Georgetown University shows that there have been lower unemployment rates for recent graduates in education (5%), engineering (7%) and the health sciences (4.8%), all areas that are “tied to stable or growing industry sectors and occupations.”

The future seems bleak for students. While it never hurts to build your resume and gain experience and add to a growing network, for some there may come a time when you’ll have to settle for an office job outside your desired field.

Party hard while you still can, seniors. But don’t let your last hurrah distract you from the “real world” you’ll be entering in a few months.

The Rundown: Obama, Romney and the issues

By Hilary Ribons, Staff Writer
@hilaryalexisr

It’s almost election time. And with a few televised political debates under our belts, it’s time to start considering who we are going to vote for.

Though it’s truly entertaining to watch two politicians verbally duke it out, I was left at the end of the debates still seriously wondering what each candidate’s stance was on some key issues.

Even after watching the debate, it’s easy to be confused as to where both presidential candidates really stand. In an effort to fully understand the candidates, I looked up their stances on some key issues and put them side by side for an easy comparison. Most of the information below was pulled from their websites, which are obviously not objective, but still state their stances. The information that I got was my understanding of each candidate’s stance, and hopefully will help you on your way to looking over the policies that the candidates are endorsing.

Remember, we are voting into office the president who will be making decisions that shape the same country that we’re graduating into soon. Hopefully my preliminary research, complete with a few websites I found helpful, will inspire you to vote as a truly informed citizen.

Obama

Romney

Education 

- Placed a cap on federal student loan repayments at 10 percent of income
– Offer incentives to keep qualified, successful teachers in the classroom
– Allow the states to create their own plans for education reform, instead of abiding by No Child Left Behind
– Offer incentives to public schools by rewarding innovation and reform
– Reformed/expanded post-Sept. 11 G.I. Bill to include more G.I.’s eligible for education benefits.
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- Allow low income and special needs students to decide what school they would like to attend
– Provide incentives for states to increase choices and alternatives for parents
– Make charter and digital schools more effective
– Make report cards public as part of an effort to improve “No Child Left Behind”
– Offer teachers incentives through greater job flexibility and rewards and through cutting down on certification requirements.
– Strengthen and simplify Financial Aid System
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Energy

- Double fuel efficiency standards
– Increase natural gas production within the United States
– Open more land for development
–  Increase oil production, increase safety measures
– Increase wind and solar energy
– Invest government money in researching clean coal technology
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- Put control of energy within state lines (excluding those that are off-limits by law) into the hands of state government
– Open offshore areas within the United States for energy development and set minimum production targets for these areas
– Pursue a North American Energy partnership with Canada and Mexico
– Attempt to slightly strengthen environmental laws and regulations and “streamline” limitations on “red tape,” or oppositions, surrounding new developments
– Put money into private-sector research and development of new energy technologies
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Health Care

- Affordable Care Act:
– Prevents insurance companies from putting a cap on coverage, or dropping coverage when you become sick
– Provides those with Medicare free preventative services and lower costs on prescription drugs and monthly premiums
– Stop health insurance companies from charging women more than men for their coverage
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- Putting states in charge of medical insurance and caring for the poor, uninsured and chronically ill
– Promote competition in the healthcare system.
– Cap non-economic damages in medical malpractice lawsuits
– Allow individuals/small businesses to form purchasing pools
– Prevent discrimination against individuals with pre-existing conditions who maintain continuous coverage
– Facilitate IT interoperability
– Allowing people to choose what kind of healthcare plan they want, giving them options and information
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Taxes

- Those who make more than $1 million a year will pay an equal or higher percentage of their income in taxes than middle- and lower-class citizens
– No plans to cut taxes: money will go to education, manufacturing, infrastructure
– Plans cut discretionary spending
– A plan of spending cuts and revenue increases over the next decade to reduce the national deficit of $4 trillion
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- Twenty percent cut in individual taxes for everyone
– Current tax rates on interest, dividends and capital gains stay the same
– Eliminate taxes on interest, dividends and capital gains for those who make below $200,000 a year
– Eliminate the Death Tax
– Repeal the Alternative Minimum Tax
– For corporate taxes: cut the corporate tax rate to 25 percent, strengthen and make permanent R&D tax credit, switch to territorial tax system, repeal the corporate Alternative Minimum Tax
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Jobs

- In short, Obama plans to cut unemployment through
– Looks to revive manufacturing
– Looks to eliminate tax breaks for companies that outsource their jobs overseas, create incentives to bring business back to America
– Looks to implement Wall Street reform, keeping Americans from paying to bail out large banks
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- In short, Romney plans to cut unemployment
– Supports free enterprise, hard work, innovation
– Looks to reduce taxes, spending, regulation and government programs
– Looks to increase trade, energy production, human capital and labor flexibility
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Gay Marriage

- In support
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- Against it
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National Defense

- Focus on ending wars and building national economy through more investments in industry
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- Put money into improving the military
– Maintain a presence in the Middle East
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Immigration

- In his first term, Obama upped deportations of undocumented immigrants
– Upped border patrols
– Passed DREAM act, which grants a path to citizenship of children of undocumented immigrants who attended college or served in the military. In 2012, he announced that the Department of Homeland Security would no longer seek to deport young illegal immigrants if they were brought to the U.S. by their parents before 16, and are currently under the age of thirty.
– Focuses on the deportation of criminals
– Proposes plans of a “start-up visa” that allows foreign investors to open businesses in the U.S.
– Backs AgJobs Act, which allows farms to legally hire foreign workers
– Supports reform of H1B visas, vaguely
– Supports path to legalization for estimated 10.8 million undocumented immigrants already in the country
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- Unclear on stance about the deportation of minors
– Does not agree with granting amnesty– wants to keep and enforce legal pathway to citizenship
– Permanent immigration reform by offering those who serve in the military the opportunity to become legal and permanent residents
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Abortion

- Does not believe abortion should be covered by Pre-Existing Condition Insurance Plan except in cases of incest, rape or where the life of the woman would be endangered
– Supports the decision of Roe v. Wade
– Disagrees with parental notification
– Supports Planned Parenthood
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- Looks to overturn Roe v. Wade, giving power to chose legality of abortion back to individual states
– Supports Hyde Amendment, which bars federal funding for abortion advocates like Planned Parenthood
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