Tagged: The Daily Free Press

FreepOUT: A visual review of the year

By Editors

As Spring semester 2013 comes to a close, we bring you our most impactful photos and stories. Thank you for your continuos support with The Daily Free Press. Our print issue will return in Fall 2013, stories and updates will be posted on our website periodically throughout the summer.

‘Snowbrawl’ draws hundreds, BUPD take student into custody

Students participate in ‘Snowbrawl Fight part two’ February 9 on the Esplanade after Winter Storm Nemo dumped two feet of snow February 8. PHOTO BY TAYLOR HARTZ/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Students participate in ‘Snowbrawl Fight part two’ February 9 on the Esplanade after Winter Storm Nemo dumped two feet of snow February 8. PHOTO BY TAYLOR HARTZ/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Brownstone fire leaves $5 million in damages

A three-alarm fire destroys the fourth and fifth floor of a Back Bay brownstone February 20. PHOTO BY MICHELLE JAY/ DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

A three-alarm fire destroys the fourth and fifth floor of a Back Bay brownstone February 20. PHOTO BY MICHELLE JAY/ DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Total cost of BU set at over $57K for 2013-14 academic year

Boston University officials released the tuition increases for the 2013-2014 school year March 18. The graph shows the change in the total tuition and housing costs since 1995. GRAPHIC BY CHRIS LISINSKI/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Boston University officials released the tuition increases for the 2013-2014 school year March 18. The graph shows the change in the total tuition and housing costs since 1995. GRAPHIC BY CHRIS LISINSKI/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Terriers fall to Northeastern in Beanpot first round

Senior captain Wade Megan hangs his head on the bench after Northeastern University scores its third goal in the first game of the Beanpot at TD Garden February 4. PHOTO BY MICHELLE JAY/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Senior captain Wade Megan hangs his head on the bench after Northeastern University scores its third goal in the first game of the Beanpot at TD Garden February 4. PHOTO BY MICHELLE JAY/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Letter from the editor: Boston marathon coverage

By Hilary Ribons, Blog Editor
@hilaryalexisr

An observer looks past police barricades towards a deserted Boylston Street/ PHOTO BY HILARY RIBONS

An observer looks past police barricades towards a deserted Boylston Street the day after two explosions ended the Boston Marathon early/ PHOTO BY HILARY RIBONS

The past few days have been hard for Boston. After the explosions that ended the Boston Marathon early yesterday, a somberness has fallen over the city. Everyone is still on edge and heightened security remains on Boylston.

Today, Online Editor Melissa Adan and I went down to Newbury to take some photos and interview people the day after the event. The city seems to be slightly quiet and deserted, but perseverant.

In respect of recent events, the online team has chosen to withhold posts on the blog until tomorrow evening.

Though the last couple of days have been difficult, some good has come out of it as well. Whenever something like this happens, though terrible, it offers the chance for people to unite and support each other. Buzzfeed.com  produced a list of ways that the nation has stepped up to aid and support those involved in the Marathon explosions. This included marathon runners completing the race and going directly to the hospital to donate blood, good samaritans who helped at the scene and an ongoing google doc that was created a few hours after the event in which people listed open space they had in their home for visiting runners and their families who couldn’t leave the city.

I would also like to commend the newspaper staff on its coverage of this event. It has truly been trying and I couldn’t be more proud. Staff photographer Kenshin Okubo’s photos are receiving international attention and made it onto the front page of the online edition of the New York Times. Online Editor Melissa Adan’s video has now been featured on NBC Latino, NBC Miami and Miami’s WSVN News. Additionally, the rest of the staff has been producing excellent coverage that is being closely watched by many in this city and the rest of the world.

I believe in the strength of this city. Of course no one will ever forget, but they will move forward. The words Obama said at the press conference held on Monday evening echo throughout the city:

“Boston is a strong and resilient town; so are its people.”

A sign outside of a restaurant on Newbury street, near Boylston, echoes the words of President Obama in a press conference held Monday night./ PHOTO BY HILARY RIBONS

A sign outside of a restaurant Tuesday on Newbury street, near Boylston, echoes the words of President Obama in a press conference held Monday night./ PHOTO BY HILARY RIBONS

FreepOUT: Covering Silber

By Lauren Dezenski, Online Editor

Eight hours. That’s how long it took for The Daily Free Press Fall ’12 E-Board to rummage through our office archives on Thursday in a frantic effort to piece together full coverage for former Boston University President John Silber’s death.

It’s no stretch to say the E-board members can recount his or her location when they found out Silber died.

It was shocking, but didn’t come as much of a surprise, either.

“He was 86, had a life well lived and his death wasn’t unexpected,” said Managing Editor Sydney Shea.

Those who could flocked to the newsroom for much of the day Thursday. Many, including Campus Editor Emily Overholt, Social Media Editor Sofiya Mahdi and Associate Campus Editors Chris Lisinski and Amy Gorel were in the office from before noon until 8 p.m.

“This happened on our watch,” Shea said. “It fell on us [The Daily Free Press] to portray him as truthfully as possible.”

Lisinski and Gorel worked for much of the day on a piece on Silber’s legacy.

“We dug through archives and interviews and learned as we went, doing coverage that as students, we wouldn’t have learned otherwise,” Lisinski said. “We were then able to take what we learned and transmit it to our reader base as much as possible.”

Though many news outlets posted Silber’s obituary within a few hours of the announcement, The FreeP held back, not posting our copy until around 2 p.m.

“We don’t always get it [the story] first, and that’s something that we have to work on,” Editor-in-Chief Steph Solis said.

Much of the pace of coverage had to do with the student body in mind. It now fell upon us to inform thousands of students about someone we barely knew ourselves, yet led a huge transformation that brought BU to its current state as one of the top research schools in the country. We sought stories that had a deeper analytical look, ultimately taking longer to develop given the reams of newsprint archives in the office.

The keyboard function “control-find” was sorely missed, to say the least.

Ultimately, the stories’ research quality took precedence over churning them out at break-neck pace, and we stand behind that decision.

“Our job is to educate the student body,” Solis said. “What I think we did was respond from the present state. And in the present state, we as a paper and as a student body have moved on [from the harsh sentiments toward Silber of previous decades].”

In the past, Silber was known for his antagonistic role with not only students and staff, but also The FreeP. We were also known to give it right back to him, too. Nowhere was this clearer than in the archives.

“I think having the opportunity to look back on the archives [ … ] adds character in ways that no obit or sound bite can provide,” Solis said.

If Silber and The FreeP’s relationship is worth noting, so too is the fact that as a staff,  “We didn’t have extreme opinions of him,” Shea said. “We didn’t have an agenda behind this.”

As Boston University students, Silber is essentially a historical figure, and at The FreeP, our work included seeking to comprehend him. We determined understanding Silber’s relationships ultimately leant itself to the coverage as a whole, as well as our efforts to correctly portray him.

“He was a man that operated at both ends of what most people would consider right and wrong,” Lisinski said. “He [Silber] brought a lot to BU and did a lot for the future of the university—faculty and future students, but at the same time, he upset a lot of people and alienated a lot of people.

“I think when looking at him [Silber], you have to take both aspects into consideration. No person is black and white and you can’t look at anything simply. I think he’s a fantastic piece of evidence that you can be right and wrong at the same time.”