A return to the classics

By Marie Goldstein, Staff Writer
@Marie_Goldstein

I am not an art expert, but artists from Vincent Van Gogh to Jan Vermeer are able to make me fall in love with their timeless paintings. Each painting’s back-story combined with the opinion of the viewer creates compelling conversations and unique perspectives.

Having visited the Boston Museum of Fine Arts and both the Guggenheim and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, I have picked up a taste for certain paintings. I may not have a sense for the texture, the medium and the history behind the paintings, but I do humor myself with my own thoughts. My favorites are paintings that I can create my own story for what is going on in the painting. Usually, I challenge myself to create a story that I know the painter was definitely never thinking. I look at Pierre Auguste’s “Luncheon Of The Boating Party” and picture a Boston University “morning after” brunch from back in the day. Below are a few of my other favorites you should check out if you’re looking to enjoy fine art.

Vincent van Gogh

“Café Terrace at Night” by Vincent van Gogh

Although I have yet to travel to France, I can imagine every corner has a perfect place such as this. This café looks like the most enchanting place in France for a date. Take notes, gentlemen! I expect this atmosphere for our first date. The textures accentuate the cobblestones, the wooden floor of the café, the buildings and the night sky. My favorite part of this painting is the stars in the sky, which look like daisies.

Johannes Vermeer

“The Girl with a Pearl Earring” by Johannes Vermeer

This painting is one of my favorites because of the novel “Girl With A Pearl Earring” by Tracy Chevalier. Chevalier did exactly what I like to do: make her own story out of a painting. I love how she came up with an elaborate story as to why the girl in the painting is dressed like that and why she only is showing one pearl earring. Who knows if Vermeer would approve of her story or whether Chevalier was correct in her predictions, but her creativity is admirable. To me this painting displays innocence and mystery. She’s classy with pearls, but I wonder how she lost the other? Was it a night out gone bad?

Renoir

“Luncheon of the Boating Party” by Pierre-Auguste Renoir

I love this paining because I am upset that I wasn’t invited to this gathering! One of my favorite things in college is Sunday brunch that my friends and I host ever week. If we were born decades earlier this is probably what it would look like. The mannerisms of the people portrayed in the painting are hilarious. The painting shows two men talking to one girl, a girl looking off into the distance wishing she was talking to one of those gentlemen and the random girl who would rather just play with her puppy. If you ask me, take away the fancy clothes and this looks like a Sunday morning at BU.Claude Monet

“Red Boats” by Claude Monet

This painting reminds me of my hometown in Long Island even though LI is not nearly as beautiful as France. Growing up in a beach town meant weekends down at the bluff where sailboats would be sailing daily. Even though Monet has many paintings of boats, this one stands out to me because the red boats are different than the others. This paining is definitely brighter and more colorful than his other ones. It reminds me of the perfect summer day—definitely something I’m missing these first few weeks of fall.

Thomas Kinkade

“A New Day at the Cinderella Castle” by Thomas Kinkade

This painting is more recent than the others. It’s probably my most embarrassing art confession, but if this painting doesn’t scream perfection, I don’t know what does. I didn’t think that something could be more beautiful than Cinderella’s castle at Disney World, but this painting makes it jump off the canvas. The pink and purple undertones create a mystical tone, complimented by Bambi on the lawn and Tinkerbell in the sky.

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