50 Shades of Pink

By Katrina Uy, Staff Writer
@katreenz

MFA’s Think Pink on display./PHOTO VIA Katrina Uy

Cherry blossoms, cotton candy and girls in frilly lace dresses are just some of the many possibilities that might come to mind when one thinks of the color pink.

From the palest shades of amaranth to the more vibrant fuchsia and magenta, since the later half of the 20th century, the color pink has been associated with romance, flowers, delicateness, femininity and even boldness.

Think Pink,” the newest exhibition at the Museum of Fine Arts, prompts visitors to reflect on the meaning of the color pink as it has evolved through time, be it through its evolution in the use of fashion and accessories, or its association with social and gender classification. The exhibit highlights several dresses from the collection of the late Evelyn Lauder, who was known for creating the pink ribbon as a symbol for breast cancer awareness in 1992. It also showcases a handful of works from other influential designers, such as Ralph Lauren, Christian Dior and Dolce & Gabbana.

On Friday, I went to the Museum of Fine Arts for the very first time in an effort to get a much-needed breath of fresh air and explore areas off-campus. As someone who’s had a lifelong aversion to all things pink, I was pleasantly surprised by how fascinating I found the exhibit.

Though it was smaller than I was expecting it to be, its size by no means limits the message it aims to create. Rather than overwhelming visitors in a splash of pink, the exhibit draws one’s eyes to the artfully selected pieces on display. It doesn’t fail to capture one’s attention and stir intriguing topics to dwell on, with captions explaining how pink hadn’t been associated with femininity until the 1920s. Before that, both boys and girls wore pink undergarments and it wasn’t uncommon for men to wear pink formal suits. It wasn’t until the 19th century when darker business suits became trendy for men.

“Think Pink” opened last Thursday, coinciding with the beginning of Breast Cancer Awareness Month. The exterior of the museum will also be illuminated in pink every night for the rest of October.

The exhibit can be found in the Loring Gallery (Gallery 276) and will be open to the public until May 26, 2014. Entry to the Museum of Fine Arts is free for BU students with identification.

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