Tagged: break

Science Tuesday: Chill Out Over Break, It’s Good For You

By Sanah Faroke, Staff Writer
@sanahfaroke

Typically for spring break, I go home. Don’t get me wrong, it’s actually amazing. I get to see my family and my friends and drive my own car and not deal with schoolwork and oh, did I tell you I’m from Miami? Basically, I live where everyone vacations. There’s the beach, the parties, the sun, the tan (except I’m already really tan so I hide under an umbrella). I can even wear flip flops, which is obviously a necessity.

The thing is, although I’m in paradise, I still think about all the work I have to do. I plan to apply for jobs this spring break (How much fun is that?). Well, it’s actually pretty exciting because I’m a nerd, who also plans to read for fun during spring break.

But the fact of the matter is, my mind still wanders back to my textbooks, my job apps, my laptop — and anxiety kicks in. I start to remember a time where the week before, I was in the freezing cold, always tired and stressed out and worrying, and you might as well put me in a mental hospital because I’m going ballistic. I freak out like any other normal college student and when it comes down to it, I basically planned my whole “vacation time” around doing work.

The thing is, we actually need to chill out.

This theory of taking breaks goes back to a study in 1999 by Wall Street insurance company New Century Global, who collaborated with the Cornell University Ergonomics Research Laboratory. In the 10-week study, they used a program to remind employees to keep good posture and take short breaks. Researchers found that the workers who took breaks were 13 percent more accurate in their work on average, while other workers who didn’t take breaks slipped up.

In another study published in the journal Cognition, researchers found that if people took short breaks, it would help them maintain focus without losing the quality of their work like it would if they worked overtime.

It’s not like I don’t take short breaks anyway, thanks to my BFF, the Internet.

Let’s be real, you know you take breaks all the time to watch Ellen DeGeneres because she’s hilarious. That’s a given, but seriously, watching those funny Parks and Rec clips do more than waste time — same goes for spring break. Yes, I know, it’s fun to dance on tables and ruin your liver, but remember, spring break is a much needed mental break. This week will actually help your concentration and help with your work performance after vacation. If you drink too much Corona and kill your brain cells, well, I don’t think I can help you there.

Either way, just “Don’t go cray on your vacay, brown suga.”

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Texas Takes Boston: Snow

By Kate Ebeling, Staff Writer
@K_ebbie

It's too cold for skirts and tights, time to bring out the 'big guns'/ PHOTO VIA Flickr user Nydia Hartono

It’s too cold for skirts and tights, time to bring out the ‘big guns’/ PHOTO VIA Flickr user Nydia Hartono

A new year means a new me. Long gone are the days of my subtle judgment on the current climate of the music industry. With the weather having gone from cold to unearthly, and Boston looking incredibly unfamiliar to a Texas native, so I’ve decided to dedicate this 2014 column to discovering Beantown from a (very cold) transplant’s perspective. Enjoy!

In case you didn’t know, Texas weather is unpredictable. Because the state is so big, weather varies from snow and sleet to hot, humid, muggy days. Hailing from Houston, I am an expert of dressing for days that top out at 102 degrees paired with 90 percent humidity.

Houston’s weather has trained me to dress well while allowing for my body to regulate temperatures and not die of a heat stroke. I say this in jest, but I can tell you that it has happened.

When I packed for Boston, I brought up six pairs of denim shorts, cute floral culottes, and skirts. Skirts for days in the park, skirts for class and skirts for long walks. August was warm, and I smugly told my parents that I was, in fact, right in bringing up all of these clothes that were highly inappropriate for normal Boston weather.

I made it all the way to Thanksgiving Break. My meager wardrobe worked by constantly washing the four pairs of pants I owned, and throwing in a couple days of sweatpants. Weekends were tough, but I made it work with a lot of the shorts and tights combo, and a lot of complaining about how cold I was. By the time I came back from Christmas Break, I knew that the snowpocalypse was coming. It was time for the shorts to retire.

Forget the infantry, I had to bring in the big guns.

Firstly, pants are a must. No matter how cut your calves are, no matter how skinny your ankles look in those mini shorts, pants are the only way to go. Pants and tights are the new shorts and tights; the added warmth is a solid bonus. Secondly, forget the crop top. I’ve made many attempts to work the crop top while there is a solid half-foot of snow on the ground, and it’s not worth it. Trust me. Your belly button will thank you.

Also, jackets. We all know you don’t want to carry your jacket to a party. You don’t want to look bulky and lame walking through Allston or down Comm. Ave., but as someone who is used to wearing crops and denims for about 11 months out of the year, the jacket is worth it. I don’t care how “used to 11 degree weather” you are, bring the jacket. Always. You will thank me as you stumble back to your dorm, unable to feel your face and hands, as the snow falls in your hair.

And finally, never wear heels. I wore cowboy boots to parties back home. And kids wore them to school. Yes, that is a real thing. And yes, cowboy boots have heels. Little ones, but even those are too much to wear on a slick, long walk like Comm Ave. Too many people to watch you eat it if somehow you manage to lose your balance.

As a Texan taking on Boston, I hope all those who are also transplants heed my advice: never underestimate the power of mother nature, especially on the east coast.

Life Hacks: How to Survive Thanksgiving at Home

By Shivani Patel, Staff Writer
@shizupates

Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving is almost here/ PHOTO VIA Flikr user Craig Dugas.

It’s that time of year where Halloween decorations may still be up, but advertisements for Christmas gifts are already coming out. It seems as though some forget that we have this holiday during which we celebrate the American Indians and the Pilgrims coming together.

Honestly, I think we should be giving this holiday a bit more credit. Do we get a whole week off for Halloween? Didn’t think so.

I think we all need this break because let’s face it, some of us are losing steam and getting overwhelmed due to a lack of sleep and massive amounts of stress. Luckily, Thanksgiving is the perfect way to rest up and come back stronger than ever for the last month of your fall semester (where did the time go?). But before you go postal, here are a few things to remember:

1. Realize that you don’t have free reign

This especially applies to those of you going home to your immediate families. College is wonderful in that you can do whatever you want (for the most part) because no one is going to tell you “no.” This is your time to be young, wild and free; but remember that your parents are still your parents. Telling them that staying up till 4 a.m. and waking up at 3 p.m. is normal probably isn’t going to fly with them. Do yourself a favor and tone down the independence – they want their baby back too!

2. Adjust to your audience

For those staying with your distant family or friends, remember that they let you in out of the kindness of their hearts. Don’t take advantage of them by being a complete slob. Instead, offer to do the dishes or help cook. After all, it’s the least you can do because, think about it – they’re saving you from spending who knows how much money on BU’s vacation housing. Plus, you get a home-cooked meal. After dealing with dining hall food for almost a full semester, I’m sure you’ll appreciate that very much.

3. Be thankful

It is, after all, Thanksgiving. Appreciate where you are and what you’ve been given. You’re going to one of the best colleges in the Boston area. Not everyone gets the opportunity to do so. We’re in such a beautiful place with some of the best people I’ve ever met. There are so many things to do and so many people to meet that it’s almost overwhelming, and it’s something we can easily take for granted. Take the break as a breather from BU and  use it to realize all the opportunities you have. If you haven’t done much here, do something! Get pumped, you still have the rest of the semester to do something awesome.

Cheesiness aside, I hope you all have a wonderful Thanksgiving filled with great food and loved ones, whether they be your family or your friends.